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Author Topic: 'The King's Speech'  (Read 13534 times)
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Water Nymph
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« Reply #15 on: January 18, 2011, 12:43:34 PM »

There are a few historical discrepancies

The ones I know of are pretty minor; e.g. Churchill was actually a backer of Edward VIII (his political career was nearly terminated by it); and George VI took a while to come around to an anti-Nazi point of view.

The thing I'm curious about is the relationship at the heart of the movie, between George VI and the speech guy - was the speech guy really that 'familiar' with his patient? I just have a hard time believing that even a colonial, in that day and age, could treat a member of the royal family quite that way. There's a book (Mark Logue, Peter Conradi, "The King's Speech"), but I have yet to obtain it. Anyone know more?

Noel


Interesting point you raise there jnc.  The film shows Bertie initially wanting to reject Logue's assistance, but as the film progresses, suggests that although initially on a "professional" basis, a mutual and heartwarming respect develops, which culminates in Logue receiving the Royal Victorian Order in recognition of his personal contribution.

What I also picked up on was how lonely a "Royal" life appears to be.  Bertie/George VI put his faith in Logue as a professional and as a friend which was seemingly frowned on by the Archbishop of Canterbury.

I cannot find anything more specific relating to their personal relationship, but I've attached the following link which may be of interest ...

http://wellcomelibrary.blogspot.com/


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« Reply #16 on: January 18, 2011, 12:44:33 PM »

If this is half as good as The Madness of King George I'm all over it.

pip pip...what what.
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« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2011, 12:46:29 PM »

If this is half as good as The Madness of King George I'm all over it.

pip pip...what what.

You will not feel shortchanged, that's for sure!  Big Smile
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« Reply #18 on: January 18, 2011, 01:32:17 PM »

I would quite like to see Inception receive one or two awards

That is one strange movie...

I have mixed feelings about it. The thing is that considered purely as a movie, it's technically pretty wonderful (plot, images, acting, specials, etc, etc). However, it doesn't really seem to say much of any depth, whereas to me a truly great movie also should say something ('A Man For All Seasons' being my prime example).

But maybe not - 'Silence of the Lambs' doesn't really say much of anything deep, but it's one of the truly great movies (that scene where Lecter takes off after Starling, talking about her shoes, and her face just kind of crumples, is one of the great scenes in all of cinema). And a lot of music is the same way - there's very little jazz that 'says' anything, but it's still great stuff.

Here's where I could start mumbling about Plato's concept that the arts should have as a goal the making of better citizens, but I'll stop before I bore everyone... Big Smile

Noel
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« Reply #19 on: January 18, 2011, 01:36:21 PM »

Quote
Here's where I could start mumbling about Plato's concept that the arts should have as a goal the making of better citizens, but I'll stop before I bore everyone...

Why stop there jnc?  This is your thread after all!  How else are we supposed to learn and broaden our minds? I for one am all ears ... or in this particular case eyes!
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« Reply #20 on: January 18, 2011, 01:38:07 PM »

I prefer Playboy's artsy concept of using airbrushing to make better citizens.... Rasta
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« Reply #21 on: January 18, 2011, 01:39:03 PM »

 ROFL lmao
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« Reply #22 on: January 18, 2011, 01:42:13 PM »

The thing I'm curious about is the relationship at the heart of the movie, between George VI and the speech guy - was the speech guy really that 'familiar' with his patient? I just have a hard time believing that even a colonial, in that day and age, could treat a member of the royal family quite that way. There's a book (Mark Logue, Peter Conradi, "The King's Speech"), but I have yet to obtain it. Anyone know more?

Noel


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-12116320

Finding the real King's Speech


The King's Speech, which tells the true story of King George VI's attempt to overcome his stammer with the help of maverick Australian speech therapist, Lionel Logue, is due for release on Friday.

The film is already tipped for Oscar glory, but such success might not have been possible without the discovery of Lionel Logue's diaries only nine weeks before filming began.

Will Gompertz spoke to Lionel Logue's grandson Mark about the unearthed archive and what it reveals about the remarkable friendship between the King and his therapist.

... and

http://www.usatoday.com/life/books/news/2011-01-18-kingssbook18_ST_N.htm
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« Reply #23 on: January 18, 2011, 02:25:52 PM »

Of course it's difficult to ascertain at what level of open friendship they reached but apparently it's the real deal.

Oh, I don't doubt that they were very close - I was more wondering about the familiarity, i.e. the way he acted towards George VI, like they were not only on an equal social level, but almost family.

(Back then, social level was a huge deal, of course, but also people were much more 'stand-offish'. I was just reading a book about Ventris, the decipherer of Linear B, and it mentioned how he and his professional partner in that endeavour, Chadwick, celebrated the one-year anniversary of their work together by agreeing to call each by their Christian names! Image than happening today: two people of equal social class working very closely together for months, and still calling each other 'Mr. Ventris' and 'Mr. Chadwick'!)

The 'USA Today' article (thanks for the pointer, 32) gave an example, when it pointed out that it would have been really unlikely for Logue to have called him 'Bertie', a family name.

Although maybe there was some of that, as a deliberate part of the treatment (since stammering is in part a psychological disorder), and he felt he had to force an almost-family level of familiarity? Dunno, but would love to know.

Quote
Of course the embellishment for effect is going to have it's play in the movie version of their lives.

And if they really were distant and formal in manner (even though close emotionally), it might have been hard for a modern audience to appreciate how that seeming contradiction could work?

Noel
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« Reply #24 on: January 18, 2011, 03:21:59 PM »

If this is half as good as The Madness of King George I'm all over it.

pip pip...what what.

Loved that film. I was fortunate enough to see the original National Theatre production, which also starred Nigel Hawthorne.
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« Reply #25 on: January 18, 2011, 06:32:24 PM »

If this is half as good as The Madness of King George I'm all over it.

pip pip...what what.

Loved that film. I was fortunate enough to see the original National Theatre production, which also starred Nigel Hawthorne.

Wow CH ... that must have been a real treat!  Nigel Hawthorne also did a superb job as Sir Humphrey Appleby in Yes Minister and Yes Prime Minister.  An example of British humour at its best.
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« Reply #26 on: January 21, 2011, 10:28:14 AM »

Good news for anyone that wants to see this movie but hasn't had the chance to yet.  It's still playing at Liberty this weekend.  Showtimes on Friday and Saturday are 2:30, 6 and 8:45.  Showtimes on Sunday are 2 and 5:30.
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« Reply #27 on: January 21, 2011, 02:45:00 PM »

Thanks...  didn't know that!

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« Reply #28 on: January 21, 2011, 02:58:01 PM »

A phonecall to Liberty confirmed that it's been held over for a further week.   Yippee!  I'm going with the girls on Wednesday.
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« Reply #29 on: January 23, 2011, 01:57:22 PM »

It appears that Colin Firth's younger sister Kate helped him master the stammering required for the film ...


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-1349666/Colin-Firths-sister-taught-stammer-role-The-Kings-Speech.html


Revealed: The little sister who taught Colin Firth to stammer for acclaimed role in The King's Speech
By Polly Dunbar

Last updated at 4:10 PM on 23rd January 2011

He is the runaway favourite to win Best Actor at the Oscars for his portrayal of King George VI’s struggle to overcome his stammer with the help of an unorthodox Australian speech therapist. And, in a case of life imitating art, Colin Firth has revealed that he too relied on expert advice during his preparation for the role from his younger sister, Kate.

Kate, a professional voice coach described by her brother as ‘jaw-dropping’ in her abilities, helped the 50-year-old actor to master the King’s debilitating speech impediment.

 Sibling support: Colin Firth turned to his sister Kate (pictured), who is a professional voice coach, as he mastered the King's stammer
The King’s Speech tells the story of Prince Albert Frederick Arthur George, who was reluctantly thrust into the limelight and on to the throne after his brother Edward VIII abdicated to marry divorced American socialite Wallis Simpson.

When the outbreak of the Second World War required the new King, by then known as George VI, to become a voice of reassurance for the nation over the radio, his battle to speak fluently became all the more crucial.

His wife Elizabeth, played by Helena Bonham Carter, found a speech therapist called Lionel Logue to help him.

 More...‘Porn discos’ and elocution lessons: King’s Speech location is mansion used for sex parties
The family Colin Firth left behind: How he will always be in debt to the reclusive beauty who bore his first son

The King gradually grew close to Logue, played by Geoffrey Rush, as he learned to manage his stammer.
Mr Firth said: ‘I turned to the best speech therapist I know, which happened to be my sister, and said, "What would an unconventional guy in 1937 have done with this man?” A lot of the routines that you see, the bizarre stuff, were her ideas.’
The critically acclaimed British film has been a commercial success both at home and in the US.
 Film therapy: Colin Firth, centre, as George VI, with Helena Bonham Carter and Geoffrey Rush
Mr Firth’s performance has already won him a Golden Globe and he is the odds-on favourite to win the Best Actor awards at next month’s Baftas and Oscars.
He said: ‘I have had it explained this is common to everyone who struggles with stammering all you want is to get to the end of a sentence. To speak is your dream, content is often secondary. You’ll order fish instead of beef at a restaurant because you can’t get the “b” out.’
 Critical acclaim: Colin Firth with his Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture award at the Golden Globes
Although Kate declined to comment on her role when contacted by The Mail on Sunday, on her website she describes herself as ‘personal adviser to Colin Firth’ for The King’s Speech.
She writes: ‘I have recently provided some consultancy to Colin Firth on the upcoming film The King’s Speech which deals in part with the terrible issues King George VI faced with a dreadful stutter and fear of public speaking.’
She adds that she was able to advise on the exercises the King would have done with Logue in his effort to lose the stammer, offering ‘tips about how such a coach may have worked’.
Kate, 49, is the second child of David and Shirley Firth, both of whom were university lecturers.
She originally followed her elder brother into acting, studying drama at university. Kate and Colin’s younger brother Jonathan is also an actor who has appeared in television programmes including Midsomer Murders.
After a stint acting with the Royal National Theatre, Kate gained a postgraduate diploma in Voice Studies from The Central School of Speech and Drama and a postgraduate certificate in Psychosynthesis Therapeutic Counselling.
Since 1996, she has worked as a voice coach on films and in theatre, and taught at drama schools including her alma mater The Central School of Speech and Drama and Bristol Old Vic Theatre School.
 Sister act: Colin Firth as a child with his sister Kate who helped him master his role
Mr Firth has said of her talents: ‘I have watched her repeatedly transform hopeless cases (my judgment, not hers) into brilliant communicators. The effect is quite jaw-dropping. But, perhaps even more remarkably, she also takes brilliant communicators and transforms them into slightly better ones.’
Kate, who like Logue is also trained in emotional therapy, focuses on the  psychological reasons for problems with speech.
On her website, she says: ‘The voice is the bridge between our inner feeling, thinking world and the outer world into which we speak.’
Bonnie Hurran, a former colleague of Kate at the Bristol Old Vic, said: ‘She was our Head of Voice for the international students and it was a great piece of luck to have her.
‘I’ve never known a teacher like her. She brings so much out of her students because she combines the usual vocal exercises with a focus on the psychological links with the voice. She believes the voice is a mirror to the soul.
 Tipped for Oscar success: Colin Firth and Helena Bonham Carter
‘She does an awful lot for the confidence of those she teaches, and helps their acting enormously by teaching them to express themselves fully.’
Mr Firth, who became a heart-throb when he played Mr Darcy in the 1995 BBC adaptation of Pride And Prejudice, has enjoyed a new level of success in his career since he starred as gay university professor George Falconer in A Single Man two years ago.
The part won him an Oscar nomination last year. He lost out to Jeff Bridges, but Mr Firth is widely expected to triumph this year.
‘Kate was very involved and sometimes came on set,’ said a source who worked on The King’s Speech.
‘She taught Colin some of the unconventional techniques which she uses in her sessions. Colin was hugely grateful for all the help she gave him.’
*********************************************************************************************
The King's Speech odds on for Oscar nod
By BAZ BAMIGBOYE

The King's Speech has dramatically increased its odds on winning the top Oscar.

The film which chronicles how George VI coped with a crippling speech impediment  won the Producers Guild of America's best picture award.

It's a huge deal and of major significance because the past three winners of the PGA Award,The Hurt Locker, Slumdog Millionaire and No Country For Old Men, went onto take the Oscar for best film.
In fact seven out of the last ten PGA best film winners won the Oscar so the odds are in The King's Speech's favour.

What it also means is that the Oscar race became a real competition Saturday night.

 Race heating up: The King's Speech has won the Producers Guild of America's best picture award

Up until now The Social Network had been winning every big film award going  and had been widely tipped to take home the PGA trophy as well.

But all of a sudden The King's Speech emerged as the victor.

It will give the picture ,which stars Colin Firth ,Helena Bonham Carter and Geoffrey Rush, tremendous momentum, which till now had been going The Social Network's way.

Now attention will turn to the Oscar nominations being announced on Tuesday out of  the headquarters of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Beverly Hills.

There will be ten best picture nominees and The King's Speech and The Social Network will most certainly be on that list.

 Odds on: Seven out of the last ten PGA best film winners won the Oscar so the odds are in The King's Speech's favour, says Baz Bamigboye
Firth will land a best actor nomination  and his portrait of George VI is the favourite to win.
Next Sunday will bring the Screen Actors Guild awards and both The King's Speech and The Social Network have their eye on the main trophy, the best ensemble.
If The King's Speech wins at SAG  then we will witness a titanic struggle between The Social Network, backed by Sony which has spent millions campaigning, and The King's Speech, backed by the Weinstein company, which has run, hitherto, a much smaller operation.

Most of Hollywood's movers and shakers were in Park City, Utah for the annual Sundance Film Festival and there were exciting scenes on Main Street as executives from the Weinstein studio suddenly had something to celebrate and countless other film world folk debated the shifting dynamics of the awards season.

 Competition: The Social Network, starring Justin Timberlake and Jesse Eisenberg, was widely tipped to take the plaudit
'It's a game changer, man', the head of one of Hollywood's top talent group's commented to the Daily Mail.
'People are still trying to work out what it means but the meaning is clear to me:it's not going to be a shoo-in for The Social Network anymore.
There was an almost arrogant assumption that the film ,which I like ,by the way, was going to waltz all the way to the Oscars and win best picture.
Now there's a race. And, baby, it's going to be a race like  we haven't seen in years.
 Acclaim: Firth is already frontrunner for Best Actor at this year's Oscars
'It's also gonna be fun ,and maybe a little brutal', said the agent, who did not want to be named because he has professional relationships with executives at both Sony and the Weinsten company.

'It's thrilling on many levels not least because no one expected The King's Speech to beat The Social Network at the Producers Guild of America.
'It makes it exciting and the juggernaut that is The Social Network has been slowed down', commented Xavier Marchand managing director of Momentum Films the company which released The Kings Speech in the UK.

Harvey Weinstein the mogul behind the film's US release did a little jig on Main Street when he heard.

The movie's three producers Iain Canning , Emile Sherman and Gareth Unwin were on hand at the Beverly Hilton to accept the PGA award from, appropriately, Helen Mirren who played George VI's daughter in The Queen.

This week The King's Speech's UK takings  will pass the £18.3 million Billy Elliot took , and the £20million taken by Calendar Girls and Shakespeare In Love.

As of close of play on Saturday night The King's Speech had taken £17.1 million in the UK alone.

The King's Speech has, as they say in Hollywood, legs.

In the US The King's Speech has taken some $60 million and could top the $100 million mark by Oscar night late next month.


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